Newfoundland, Canada – part 1

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View of the rough and rolling seas from the on-board restaurant. Perhaps the 2 course dinner was not such a great idea!

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First view of Port aux Basques just before the ship docked.

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We enjoyed tasting the local Newfoundland beer at the Port aux Basque hotel and restaurant on our first night.

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The low tyre pressure warning signal lit up on the dashboard requiring us to stop and get more air for the left rear tyre. The friendly mechanics were keen to help us out and send us back on our way.

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We saw some stunning scenes as we made our way along the Cape St George. The late afyernoon colours are to die for!

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This afternoon was a rarity; no wind and no rain. We took in a walk and were overcome by these outstanding panoramas – as well as a swarm of biting black flies too!

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Moose are a real threat on the roads. We saw a female and her young at the side of the Trans Canada Highway today however they ran back into the woods as our car approached them.

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We stayed at the Inn at the Cape, at Cape St George and enjoyed the company of new friends from Ontario over supper in the dining room. They were writers and potters enjoying their second trip here; last year they travelled the east of Newfoundland and this year it’s the west.

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After arriving at the Inn we walked to Petit Jardin and saw this plaque commemorating the pioneering French and Anglo fishing families that lived and fished here. Their boats were launched from the base of the cliffs below – which was a very scary descent down to the ocean from the clifftop each

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Gros-Morne National Park showed us tbis beautiful sky while we were at Rocky Harbour’s best restaurant.

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Enjoying lobster yet again.

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The lobster chowder appetitizer preceded the whole lobster dinner.

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This was just a magic spot to sit and enjoy the natural beauty of this country.

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So we did just that and sat enjoying the view with no wind or rain but some welcome glimpses of summer sunshine.

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A delightful camping ground at Lamond River on the way to Trout River. Camping seems to mostly involve large motor homes and rarely caravans. So far we’ve seen no-one camping in a tent at all – the regular rain would stop even the keenest from pitching a tent.

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A typical fishing cove.

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At a small camping ground the ‘take-out’ menu options are a bit limited! Just loved the tea towel.

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This helicopter was resting outside our hotel window when we woke. It was there for a fit-out to do electro magnetic surveys of ore bodies for mining companies. There is an all pervading sense that the whole of the Newfoundland we’ve seen so far is wildly remote offering a pioneering way of life to those choosing to live here. All the B & B’s so far have provided home made bread and preserves.

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Fleur de Lys is a quaint fishing village. Everyone in town was at St Michaels for a funeral on the day we visted so the town looked even more deserted than usual.

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The fishing industry here is almost gone with just a few tailenders seeking a living from these fished out waters. What will happen to these former thriving fishing communities?

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